#BookReview The Masked Truth by Kelley Armstrong

To begin this review, I have to admit I’m a little biased. I have always enjoyed Kelley Armstrong’s books and doubly so because she’s Canadian (represent!!). My review will absolutely reflect that I thoroughly enjoy her writing style and I am always down for a reading ride in her books.

So, off to the races…

This book is unique and different. It’s not the typical Kelley Armstrong book I have come to expect, but I did enjoy going off the beaten path.

Riley is our lead, and the poor girl just witnessed a murder. She was just getting set up to babysit and suddenly masked men came in and murdered the parents of the little girl she was babysitting. She didn’t see it happen, she hid under the bed, but it was still brutal and horrible for her. She was even under the impression people made fun of her for hiding under the bed with the little girl, even though that’s what saved them both.

Riley’s parents decide she needs to take part in a little therapy retreat in an old warehouse (it has been renovated, but it’s still a warehouse with no windows… definitely not my ideal place to stay). When she gets there, she meets some new friends and comes across some old ones. Good old Max is there, a strange fellow who she has seen and briefly talked to before. He’s… different (you’ll find out why in the book, no shame in me ruining the “plot twist” that isn’t a plot twist for you). All of these kids have mental health issues – cutting, anxiety, PTSD, narcissistic personality disorder, etc.

Everything seems like it’s going to be a normal day at a therapy retreat… until it’s not. Masked intruders come in and say they are holding them hostage, and chaos ensues. Death, murder, lots of pain and psychological horror gets thrown at the kids until the amazing plot twist at the end.

So, what did I think?

You need to suspend your belief a LOT for this book, but it’s a psychological YA thriller so it should be expected. Being locked in a warehouse without windows? Creepy and seems illogical. Masked intruders – highly unlikely. Lots of fake outs – even crazier. A daughter of a police officer is as good as a SWAT team – hmmmm. Does that affect my view of the story? No. I was along the ride and was able to suspend my belief. This book wasn’t meant to be “realistic” in whole, it’s a thriller.

To be honest, this book was wild. I didn’t know what way this book was going to end. Once the plot twist was coming into view, I could totally sense it buuuuuut… it’s not what you think during the first couple of chapters in this book. I really liked that it wasn’t there from the beginning but you could connect the dots if you paid attention enough. Well played Kelley!

So you add in intensity and thrills, a fast paced writing style that leaves you hooked to every word and a character that isn’t the perfect Mary Sue/Mary Jane and you’ve got yourself a good one. But there’s more… Kelley throws in an interesting romance (because most YA these days has to have some sort of romance in it). At first I wasn’t sure about the romance since it seemed force, but by the end I was totally fangirling and loved every second of it. Somehow it works, even if it seems like a bad idea.

Other points: I have no idea if the mental health portions of this book are well represented. I have my own dabblings with OCPD but none of the mental health issues shown in this book. So, as always, buyer beware.

Overall, this book was one epic journey! I enjoyed this book and would highly recommend it to someone wanting to jump into a more mature YA novel with psychological thrills.

Five out of five stars!

 

Check out this book on:
Amazon.ca
Kobo
Indigo

 

Here’s some other YA novels you might enjoy if you like The Masked Truth:
#BookReview A Woman of Valor by Gary Corbin
#BookReview Avalon Hall by Ruth Miranda
#BookReview Blue Lily, Lily Blue by Maggie Steifvater

 

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