#BookReview Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

I will be totally honest with you: I only read this book because I watched the television show and was morbidly curious about the book. I have picked up another book by Liane Moriarty (The Hyponotist’s Love Story) which was okay so I wanted to pick up another book by her. Big Little Lies was the perfect fit since I thoroughly enjoyed the television adaptation.

That being said, I actually prefer the t.v. show. Here’s why:

This book carries a lot of heavy material: sexual assault, domestic violence, abuse in general, bullying, and rich people problems. In one moment it feels really deep and real and in the next it feels like rich, white women complaining about rich, white women problems. If you read into the book, it’s supposed to be that way. It’s not only low and middle class people who have hard lives. Domestic abuse and sexual assault happens in all forms of human life these days. But this book still didn’t sit well with me.

I really wish I would have found this book before the television show. I know I shouldn’t be comparing the two genres because they are wildly different, but I liked how the television show handled these issues more. Maybe it’s the visuals, maybe it’s the music and the tone – all of the things a book can’t do – but it’s still my opinion.

That being said, this book is still an excellent read if you want a dramatic thriller set around school problems. The ending isn’t totally obvious (which is nice) but you can totally pick it up if you pay enough attention. It’s like a mystery story that’s full of gossip. Throw all of that in with some real fast paced antics and you’ve got yourself one excellent novel.

The way the book is set up is really cool, which is why it stood out to me in the beginning. There’s little police interviews scattered throughout the book that hint at what is going to come. If you’re smart and read into it a bit, you can totally guess the ending and have a good idea what is going to happen. In the same breath, if you just want to enjoy the ride you can do that too. The structure of this book is so well planned out, and that’s what impresses me. Liane Moriarty has some real talent and I want to see that talent in other novels.

I can totally see why this book is a best seller. It’s a wild book that’s also filled with some deep content. Most people can relate to something in this book, whether it be the white people problems, the struggles of parenthood, broken families or the really dark stuff. At the same time, it’s all packaged so well that it’s also enjoyable. Most books with this harsh of content lose me when it gets too dark, but I just kept trekking along and enjoying the ride. Bonus points for Liane.

My biggest little flaw in this book was that I wanted to see more of these police interviews. I’d like to see the incorrect, unreliable narrators tell more about what they thought happened. Those comments alone could be their own story. Honestly, they impressed me more than the story half the time. I was giggling and sneering at these comments, unable to help myself. I also knew the ending though (the joys of watching the television series first) so it was highly amusing to me.

Personally, I found a lot of the women to be awful. I know a lot of mothers are like that these days, but they definitely aren’t all like that in my neighbourhood. They all fought constantly, seemed to have little communication and listened to their kids more than other adults. Or, you know, didn’t listen when their kids were telling them something really important. It just seemed way over the top at times and I just couldn’t handle their bitchiness. On top of that, the book did seem a pinch too long. There was some content that could have been left out and the story wouldn’t have changed. That’s my inner student calling out to the world though – edit, revise, shorten, and meet the word count!

I think this might be one of those books you can jump back into once you know the ending. It definitely would have been a more interesting experience if I didn’t know what was coming. I could see how Liane set it up along the way, but I didn’t pick up on all of it.

Overall, this book is a cool take on a tough story. All of the connections that are woven throughout this book and the unique style has me intrigued. If you haven’t watched the television show, do it. Maybe read the book first though, because quality wise I think the television show is AMAZE-BALLS.

Three out of five stars.

 

Check this book out on:
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If you enjoyed this book (or even the television adaptation), you might enjoy these other books that have been featured on my blog:
#BookReview The Mountain Man’s Dog by Gary Corbin
#TopBooksList Briar’s Crime, Mystery & Thriller Reads
#BookReview Law and Addiction by Mike Papantonio

 

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#BookReview Touch by Courtney Maum

Touch by Courtney Maum is one of my fave reads of 2020. Seriously, this book is ridiculously good.

I was shocked by how much I loved this book. The plot sounds super intriguing, but the content just blows it out of the water. Let me explain:

Sloane is a trend forecaster, and she’s really good at it. She sees trends coming from a mile away, almost like clairvoyance. She gets hired by a tech firm because she’s so good, and they want her to help develop products for them relating to the population enjoying being childless. Sloane is married to Roman, a social media influencer obsessed with Zentai (look it up, seriously). Their relationship is rocky since he believes real, penetrative sex is a thing of the past and cyber sex is the real deal. Sloane, on the other hand, wants a physical relationship and sees the trend of real, physical social interaction to be coming back.

Things get messy when their relationship fumbles, she reaches back out to her family and she rocks the boat in her office. Especially when other people seem to be agreeing with her…

Within the pages of this book, there are so many great quotable lines and paragraphs. Courtney speaks a lot of truths within this book, and it’s super haunting. A woman being described as a port for a journeyman or the description of how a woman feels when she’s finally touched after years of not being touched… It was so beautiful. Courtney has a way with words. To top it all, she used a lot of big words I hadn’t heard before, and I love searching up new words to use in my everyday life. Frangipane is a unique word, let me tell ya. It’s a dessert!

The one sentence that summed this novel up for me was “The twenty-first century was over taking risks”, and I’d have to agree. Yet, this book argues that it’s possible to change and take those risks again… Geez Louise, this book could have been taken apart in an English class by a pro! It’s that packed full of themes and wonderful quotes!

My biggest fault of this book was the driver-less car. I totally saw some weird sci-fi plot since this car talked about different scenarios as if they were real and talked to her. I swore up and down as I was reading it that there was going to be some wild and wacky twist about this car, but there wasn’t. It was just a car. Thank you for the writing ideas Courtney, because man… my imagination went WILD.

That being said, it’s hardly a fault. I was blown away by this book and couldn’t put it down. I need to read more by Courtney in the future because her writing style and ideas totally work for me.

I highly recommend this book. I cannot say that enough. If you love dystopian fiction, contemporary drama, a pinch of romance, and a wee bit of satire on today’s society then this book will be for you! Honestly, it’s probably one of my top recommendations for my 2020 reads. It’s just so darn good!

Five out of five stars.

I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

Check this book out on:
Goodreads
Amazon.ca
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Indigo
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Find out more about Courtney Maum on:
https://www.courtneymaum.com/
Twitter – @cmaum
Goodreads Author Page

 

If you enjoyed this book (or even the review!) here’s some other books recently featured on my blog that you might enjoy:
#BookReview The Heirs by Fran Hawthorne
#BookReview 100 Tiny Tales by K. Kris Loomis
#BookReview A Long, Hot Summer by Kathleen MacMahon

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#BookReview The Heirs by Fran Hawthorne

The Heirs by Fran Hawthorne is a delightful, contemporary novel that lit up my bookshelf.

Eleanor’s Mother, Rose, has a terrible fall and is suddenly speaking Polish. For many years, Rose has kept her history of the war a secret and not shared a word to a single soul. This sudden change sparks interest in Eleanor and the hunt for a secret past begins. Family secrets are unlocked, drama ensues and life lessons are learned. Will her marriage survive? Will her Mother and her’s bond survive? Will her son ever enjoy soccer?

I found this book truly intriguing an addicting. It’s hard to tell which way this book is going to go right off the bat, which is why I truly enjoyed it. There’s so many secrets hidden and discussed, slowly being revealed as each chapter rolls on. Eleanor’s entire life seems to be falling at the seams, and yet she keeps her cool and manages herself through all of it. Not only was this book about discovering the past, it was also about taking control of your present and future! Eleanor has to manage taking care of her Mother while trying to be a wife and a Mother. Not all of her life is sunshine and roses: her relationship with her Mother is strained, her cousin seems to have a better relationship with Rose, her marriage isn’t in tip top shape, her son isn’t interested in sports, and there may be a man flirting with her! There’s so much going on for Eleanor and yet she handles it all like a pro (with some stumbles, but we all stumble once and a while).

Fran crafted this story wonderfully. I think enough information is released piece by piece, but it also moves at a fast enough pace to keep the reader interested. It’s full of contemporary drama and insights into the past (specifically World War ll).

I can truly respect this book. I found it super engaging and I definitely want more. I could analyze this book while also drifting off into another world that reflects my own.

I can’t find any real negatives about this book, if I’m being honest. I never studied much history or took a giant interest in it, so I felt like I didn’t connect with the history as much as my history buff friends could have. People who enjoy history might like the little splash of Poland that is thrown in.

Overall, I’d highly suggest this book. I think Fran has crafted one of the best books of 2020 and I will be singing it’s praises for years.

Five out of five stars.

I received this book for free from the author, Fran Hawthorne, in exchange for an honest review.

 

Check out this book on:
Goodreads
Amazon.ca
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Kobo

You can find out more about the author, Fran Hawthorne, on:
Goodreads
http://www.hawthornewriter.com/
Twitter – @hawthornewriter

 

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#BookReview The Murder of Leopold Beckenbauer by K. Kris Loomis

Man, oh man. I did NOT see that ending coming! Like… wow! What in the world just happened?!

The Murder of Leopold Beckenbauer takes some wild twists and turns in this rather short story. K. Kris Loomis does an absolutely marvelous job at allowing us a peek at Claire’s life and the brains of a few musical geniuses.

When the best musical genius comes to town, everyone needs to see his brilliance! Many piano players take a trip to a historic plantation site. Claire is one of the many musicians ready to learn from the always brilliant, but slightly insane, Leopold Beckenbauer. Along the way, many musicians learn their abilities and figure out who the real Leopold Beckenbauer is. Oh, and as the title suggests, he dies.

Claire’s troubled marriage, her tragic past, Leopold’s wacky behaviour and the kooky cast of characters all make this story really engaging. I was honestly so pulled into this story that I could hardly believe it was over! K. Kris Loomis can tell a really good story in such a small amount of space! I’m kinda annoyed that it wasn’t longer and that I couldn’t spend some more time with these characters. I was truly enchanted by the descriptions of Beethoven’s music (and the other composers too!).

I didn’t see half of this story coming from a mile away, which was super awesome! I hate when I can guess the ending by the first few pages. It took me about half the book to figure out the big twist, but I’m glad it took me that long! It’s a ‘fun’ yet tragic twist that most readers won’t catch onto unless they are paying attention. So many hints were dropped along the way that it’s “easy” to catch onto the twist, but you have to be paying attention to really grasp what’s going on. I felt like Sherlock Holmes trying to solve these mysteries!

My biggest negative is this: I want to see more of Danny. I felt like I needed a little bit more of him in this book or to see what happens with Claire and Danny. What can I say? I like a happy ending.

Overall, this book was epic! I want more mysteries like this that really pull you in and drag you along. It was such a treat! If you like Murder on the Orient Express styled books, this story will be right up your alley!

Five out of five stars!

I received a free copy of this book from the author, K. Kris Loomis, in exchange for an honest review.

 

Check out this book on:
Goodreads
Amazon.ca
Amazon.com

If you liked this book (or review!) check out some other reads you might enjoy:
#BookReview After Namaste by K. Kris Loomis
#BookReview Survving Revision: How One Writer Finished What She Started by K. Kris Loomis
#BookReview The Sinking of Bethany Ann Crane by K. Kris Loomis
#BookReview The Monster in the Closet and Other Stories by K. Kris Loomis

 

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